CK Logo
Sign in
Posts

Don’t lose your preferences!

Sign-in or sign-up to save your personalization preferences to return to later

I'm torn between doing a full stack bootcamp and teaching myself. Any tips?

6
5

User profile image
undefined undefined

Have a question or need some advice?

Ask our community of experts and members learning software engineering, design, data science, and more!

6 Answers

User profile image
1 year ago
@Caitlin Golden summed up many the benefits of attending a bootcamp very well.

I'd like to add one more thing: Community.

I'm the kind of person who learns fast and gets distracted twice as fast.

The Kenzie Academy community helps me remain accountable, connected, provides support when things get tough and we make a point to celebrate the wins along the way, no matter how big or small.

Knowing that I have some hard charging fox-hole buddies that I can trust, keeps me engaged and focused.

On the days that I feel like I don't necessarily want to put in the effort, I show up for others. In doing so, I'm inevitably reminded why I chose to attend a bootcamp versus trudging through this journey alone.
20
1
35
Show 1 comment
User profile image
1 year ago
Hi! Good question. It totally depends on yourself. If you're self motivated and can digest new material easily, you may want to self teach. However I did want to demonstrate the benefits of going to a bootcamp:

  • You have a decent idea of how long it will take you to finish a curriculum and begin your job search
  • You have additional resources to help you along the way in the form of staff and structured content
  • Bootcamps teach you the things that the industry needs NOW
  • Bootcamps are normally pretty hands- on with resume and technical interview preparation
  • Bootcamps measure their success based on how many students they can get employed!
  • After completing a curriculum, you'll normally have a host of projects that you can use for your portfolio
  • You get exposed to best practices in the industry and popular jargin
  • You also gain exposure to different approaches to coding
You can even combine the best of both worlds and choose a self-paced bootcamp.

Fill out your Fast Track profile here: careerkarma.com/apply to be matched with schools and prep courses. You can request info from those schools and an admissions advisor will follow up with answers to the questions you may have about the experience you can expect from their bootcamp.

You can also meet with a Career Karma Coach. Many of us are either current students at a bootcamp, working in our field, or BOTH. We can give you firsthand insight into what it's like to enroll in a bootcamp, and possibly narrow down your decision. You can schedule a session with me here : https://calendly.com/ck-caitlin-golden/caitlin-3

Hope this helps!
18
1
54
Show 1 comment
User profile image
1 year ago
So here’s a bit of my personal journey... I’ve attempted the self-learning thing and, for me, the most difficult thing was practicing what I learned. I always felt like I was doing well in the tutorial projects, but then trying to make something of my own felt like running into a brick wall. So I got trapped in tutorial hell. I finally decided to do a boot camp. I’m about to start on Monday and I’m hoping it provides me with more focus and ideas to make it and eventually start a career as a Software Developer. If you feel you can do the self-teaching thing and continue on to make projects of your own afterward, then do it. However, if you feel like you need more focused learning and guidance, a boot camp would probably be the best option. This is opinion based on my experiences, but maybe by sharing it helps you out a bit. Take care and I hope you figure it out!!
11
0
27
Comment post
J
1 year ago
I self taught myself for a year before I started a boot camp and the truth is all of coding involves being able to look up and find things for yourself but the boot camp will give you more direction about what to look up and why and help you learn much faster. It also teaches you other skills with tools like mock interviews that you couldn't do for yourself.
8
0
13
Comment post
J
1 year ago
Maybe start teaching yourself watching videos on Youtube, FreeCodeCamp.org, and Udemy to get a head start on some of the basics, then maybe look into a bootcamp to really speed things up. The thing about doing it all yourself is that you are likely going to have to spend some time creating the curriculum for yourself, which can be a pain and a bit discourging after a while. A good bootcamp will have it all lined up for you.
6
0
8
Comment post
Tips?

Learning by yourself (like any field) is going to takee a lot longer. So, you're either paying with time or money. Time is much more valuable.

Here are the best books to start with: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnbS1enub2Q

To limit the time you spend learning down to a year instead of 3+, get some friends to work with and hold yourself accountable.

If you'd like to speed things up, then a school and dedicated teachers are the way to go. That could also just mean a tutor or mentor. Here's a framework to help you choose the right school for you: https://vetbootcamp.net
4
0
9
Comment post

Popular discussions

Most active posts